Yes, you read that right.

This freelancer who works from home does NOT recommend that you try it.

At least NOT RIGHT AWAY.

Why is it not advisable to quit your job and jump straight into freelancing?

To find out, let’s do a quick Yes-or-No test, shall we?

  • Do you like having a steady paycheck?
  • Want to be surrounded by colleagues, team mates and bosses?
  • Need the free health card and other employee benefits?
  • Want a consistent, structured workflow with the infrastructure to support it?
  • Can’t live without the stability and consistency of a regular schedule and location?

If you answered YES on all 5 questions, please do not quit your current job at all costs.

Just don’t—it’s going to be a nightmare if you do.

Because if you do take the leap without the necessary know-how, you’re gonna crash into violent waters.

Related: The 5 Important Questions You Should Ask Yourself Before Freelancing

Find Your Core Skill

At the very least, try to identify your best skill first and honestly ask yourself if it’s something you can get paid for.

Some are good at building websites. Others write code and build useful apps. Some are skilled at marketing, adept at utilizing the web and social media to drive traffic. And there are some who are great at all-around support: able to juggle multiple tasks and push a client’s business forward. And that’s just to name a few.

Here’s the thing, the people I’ve just mentioned are real-life friends and acquaintances. And most of them started building their skills on the side. Or had a previous job that utilized the same skills.

How about you? What are you good at?

Also Read: How to become a Virtual Assistant – No Experience Needed

Develop your (Freelancing) Superpowers

In DOTA (the online game), each character has its own ultimate skill that you can unlock after reaching a certain level.

It’s the character’s most powerful attack/skill/magic – and it has the power to turn the tides of the game.

Want to turn the tide on the game of your life? Identify your core skills. Level them up.

Don’t know where to start? I recommend reading this one. It will help you figure out your freelancing superpowers.

As you try one thing at a time, you’ll connect some dots. It won’t be clear at first, but keep at it and it will lead you to finding your core skills. For example, you might start as a freelance writer. But after getting a chance to do social media marketing for a client, you realize it’s what you really like.

Do what you love

Like heroes in DOTA, freelancers have their own unique set of skills. And the most successful freelancers I know have their skills aligned with their core talents and passion.

Why is this important? Because there will be days when you’ll feel like not working at all. And on those days, the only thing that will keep you going is the love for what you do.

Me? I love to read and write. I’ll write even if I don’t get paid. You know, just to get it out of my chest sometimes. To tell a story worth sharing. Even if there’s only one person out there who’ll listen.

I created this website because when I was looking for local blogs to read about freelancing, I really couldn’t find exactly what I was looking for. I wanted to read about the ins and outs of how the whole process works, how other freelancers started their journey, and tips & tools for doing the job—from a personal perspective.

But I didn’t find any. Or maybe they’re out there but for some reason I can’t find them.

“If you can’t find what you’re looking for, build it yourself!”, the quote goes.

So build it did I. And I’m glad I did.

Another reason for building this website is to help others who want to start freelancing or work from home to have the insight and tools to do it successfully.

Because I remember a younger version of me testing the freelancing waters many years ago as a side hustle. Didn’t have anyone to learn from, didn’t know where to start. Took me weeks to score a quick transcription job in oDesk (now UpWork) where I got paid $2 to type 8 minutes of audio. I realized transcription gigs were hard and not for me.

Seek help and advice from other Freelancers

While learning from experience is still the best teacher, having useful resources and insight on how to do it will help big time.

Nowadays you can simply check Facebook, type in the job/profession/skill that you want to learn about, and in seconds you’ll be staring at a bunch of FB Groups you can join and learn from.

On the same vein, that’s my dream for HBP (Homebased Pinoy). A go-to resource for freelancers and work-at-home folks for freelancing tools, tips and guides. And the occasional musings, like this one.

Related: What it takes to succeed in Freelancing

Test the waters before you dive

Now if you’ve read up to this point, I guess it’s safe to say that you’re genuinely interested in freelancing or working from home.

And if you do, congrats, it’s a start. From this point on, you’ll start to think about ways on how you can break free from the shackles of your regular 8 to 5 job that have you stuck in traffic, always tired, always lacking in sleep, no time for family, working for people unappreciative of what you do. I should know, I used to be like that too.

But I didn’t quit my job right away. Instead, I did side gigs, developed my skills, and got to learn a lot about stuff I’m interested in. I did this for a few years.

I tested the waters first. Did practice strokes on the side of the pool, figured out how I swim best, and slowly pushed my way towards the current.

Now I’m swimming on this massive sea that is the gig economy. And there are a lot of fellow freelance Pinoys here, enjoying the waters.

So, is Freelancing something that I honestly recommend?

Let me end this piece by saying, “I do recommend freelancing and working from home—just don’t do it without any preparation, clear goals, and plans.”

Identify your core skills. Develop them. Do freelancing on the side. Work on it during weekends. Or after work. No matter how you approach it, the bottom line is that you’re doing something truly valuable. And if you do it right, it just might turn out to something that you see yourself doing for the rest of your life.

Over to you! Share your freelancing experience and tips on the comment section below!

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2 thoughts on “Why This Work-from-Home Freelancer Doesn’t Recommend Working from Home

  1. I would like to apply in a home based job. For a start as a data encoder since it’s my work experience. Can you help me. Thank you.

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